FIND OUT HOW TO WIN THE WEIGHT BATTLE DURING PERI MENOPAUSE/MENOPAUSE!

FIND OUT HOW TO WIN THE WEIGHT BATTLE DURING PERI MENOPAUSE/MENOPAUSE!

ARE YOU GAINING BODY FAT AND FINDING IT HARDER TO LOSE WEIGHT?

Abdominal Weight Gain Occurs Because Of A Drop In Oestrogen Levels, Low-Quality Sleep & Reductions In Metabolism And Muscle Tone.

LEARN MORE about HOW YOU CAN ‘HARNESS YOUR HORMONES’ 

HAVE YOU NOTICED THAT YOU HAVE GAINED WEIGHT, AROUND THE MIDDLE, BUM AND HIPS?

HAVE YOU NOTICED THAT YOU HAVE GAINED WEIGHT, AROUND THE MIDDLE, BUM AND HIPS?

AND EVEN WITH A HEALTHY, BALANCED DIET WITH EXERCISE, THE WEIGHT STILL PERSISTS.

Unbalanced Hormones and Stress Can Change How The Body Digests Food, Slow Metabolism, And Make Your Body Hold Onto Fat And Fluid.

IF YOU ANSWERED YES! FIND OUT HOW MY  ‘Harness Your Hormones’ Program CAN HELP YOU.

BUSY LIFE! DO YOU WORRY ABOUT EVERYTHING?

BUSY LIFE! DO YOU WORRY ABOUT EVERYTHING?

Are The Kids Ok? Am I Giving Them Everything They Need? I Can’t Deal With The Stress Any More. I Wish I Had More Time In The Day. I Don’t Like The Way I Look!

FOR MANY WOMEN, THIS CHRONIC STRESS RESPONSE IS NEVER SWITCHED OFF, AND THEY FIND IT HARD TO FIND THE JOY IN SIMPLE THINGS.

FIND OUT NOW HOW YOU CAN REBALANCE YOUR STRESS HORMONES AND SUPPORT YOUR BODY’S OWN UNIQUE NEEDS.

 

I HELP ADRENAL FATIGUED STRESSED WOMEN TO RENEW THEIR ENERGY, REDEFINE THEIR HEALTH AND RECLAIM THEIR LIFE.

I HELP ADRENAL FATIGUED STRESSED WOMEN TO RENEW THEIR ENERGY, REDEFINE THEIR HEALTH AND RECLAIM THEIR LIFE.

Learn How You Can Conquer Constant Stress, Anxiety, Fatigue, Brain Fog, Low Mood, Moodiness, Weight Gain, Digestive Issues, Thyroid Metabolic Issues, And Hormonal Imbalances.

COME BACK TO YOUR TRUE SELF.

BRAIN FOG, POOR MEMORY or FORGETFULNESS?

BRAIN FOG, POOR MEMORY or FORGETFULNESS?

ARE YOU FINDING IT HARD TO CONCENTRATE OR MUSTERING THE MOTIVATION?

Kristen arrived in my office, like so many women before her, almost completely worn down. COMPLETELY EXHAUSTED AND BINGING ON SUGAR AND ALCOHOL EVERY NIGHT. She told me she simply had no energy to “do life.”

LEARN HOW YOU CAN RENEW YOUR VITALITY AND FEEL AMAZING AGAIN.

FEELING REALLY TIRED ALL THE TIME?

FEELING REALLY TIRED ALL THE TIME?

AFTER A SLEEPLESS NIGHT, HAVE YOU EVER WONDERED WHY YOU WANT COFFEE AND A SWEET MUFFIN FOR BREAKFAST?

Are You Having Trouble Concentrating, Constantly Feeling Dissatisfied, Extremely Fatigued Mentally and Physically Or Mustering Motivation?

LEARN HOW I CAN HELP YOU FIND OUT HOW TO BALANCE YOUR HORMONES TO SUPPORT YOUR ADRENAL AND THYROID HEALTH.

DO YOU HAVE GUT ISSUES?

DO YOU HAVE GUT ISSUES?

Have You Been Wondering How Your Unique Gut And Microbiome Play A Role In Your Health?

Common signs and symptoms of Gut Barrier Function Issues may include Weight Gain/Loss, Bloating, Nausea, Constipation, Diarrhoea, Abdominal Pain, Sugar Cravings, Gas, Immunity Issues, Brain Fog, Anxiety, Unbalanced Hormones, Recurrent Immune Infections or sense that something isn’t quite right…

DISCOVER THE CAUSE AND CORRECT THE IMBALANCE!

ARE YOU FEELING LIKE YOUR FLUCTUATING BETWEEN SAD, HAPPY, IRRITABLE, CALM, ANGRY, DEPRESSED, ANXIOUS, MOTIVATED AND TIRED?

ARE YOU FEELING LIKE YOUR FLUCTUATING BETWEEN SAD, HAPPY, IRRITABLE, CALM, ANGRY, DEPRESSED, ANXIOUS, MOTIVATED AND TIRED?

ARE YOU WONDERING IF YOUR HORMONES ARE THE CULPRIT AFFECTING YOUR HEALTH?

Discover Why Your Hormones Are Important In Balancing Your Moods And Natural Ways To Make Your Hormones Happy.

Does PMS or menstrual discomfort disrupt your daily life?

black woman having head ache period pain PMS
Photo by Sora Shimazaki on Pexels.com

The Many Personalities of Oestrogen – the Good, the Bad, the Beautiful

Like many women, do you dread ‘that time of the month’? Do the highs and lows of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), pelvic pain or heavy flow hamper normal functioning around the time of your period? Did you know these symptoms (including hard-to-shift weight gain) may be related to imbalances in hormones such as oestrogen? This blog explores the important topic of oestrogen, as this hormone can be amazingly beautiful in our bodies, but when out of balance, it may also turn ugly.

Oestrogen is predominately thought of as a female hormone. Still, just as women have small amounts of the male hormone, testosterone – men also need some oestrogen (albeit at lower levels) for optimal health.

Oestrogen wears many hats, and they’re not all related to reproduction!

It also supports brain health. For example, it has been linked to slowing down the ravages of ageing and is protective against many neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and depression.1 Oestrogen is also considered the beauty hormone; it plays a role in collagen production and moisture retention for supple skin,2 helping you look more youthful! She is part of why women retain hair on their heads but have thinner hair elsewhere. Oestrogen will also help bones remain strong by preventing calcium loss and supporting healthy cholesterol metabolism (see Figure 1).

Figure 1: The Many Effects of Oestrogen.

All that said, oestrogen’s primary function is as a reproductive hormone. Levels begin to increase in young girls in puberty, around the time their periods start. It is produced mainly by the ovaries and will go on to shape and grow the breasts and the uterus. It’s lining (the endometrium) – essentially preparing the female body for reproduction. Interestingly, males also rely on oestrogen for the all-important task of creating healthy sperm!

Fun Fact: Did you know that during pregnancy, oestrogen levels are 1000 times higher than in non-pregnant women? This increase helps to expand the uterus to make space for the developing foetus and prepares the breasts for lactation.3

Intracrinology – Intra What?

I know I mentioned earlier that oestrogen is produced primarily by the ovaries. Still, this sneaky hormone can also be synthesised in other tissues in the body, including the breast, the brain and even in body fat! Known as the science of intracrinology, studying hormone levels in different tissues can give some fascinating insights into oestrogen activity throughout the body. As shown in Figure 2 below, many factors (such as increased production in various tissues and impaired detoxification) can disrupt the delicate balance of hormones and, in some cases, lead to having too much.

Excess oestrogen may result in symptoms such as period pain, heavy flow, PMS and even more serious presentations such as endometriosis,4 fibroids5 and breast cancer.6

Figure 2: Many Factors Can Disrupt Hormonal Balance, But There Are Things You Can Do to Correct This.

To give another example – if a woman is overweight, the extra fatty tissue can hold more oestrogen in the body, which can potentially lead to oestrogen excess and a worsening of hormonal symptoms. Learn about more ways hormones can become disrupted here.

Further, living in the modern world brings constant exposure to environmental toxins such as plastics and other chemicals; those with hormonal effects are known as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). EDCs such as bisphenol A (BPA) found in the lining of tins can increase oestrogen and change how it works in the body. Read more about this here.

Be Proactive About Keeping Oestrogen in Balance

If your pain, PMS or hormonal symptoms may be caused by too much oestrogen, then it’s time to take back control. There are many positive steps you can take towards rebalancing your hormones.

Many herbs and nutrients can be highly beneficial in reigning in out-of-control hormones. Isoflavones from soy support women’s healthy oestrogen levels by modulating oestrogen receptors (the binding sites on the cells).7 This means that soy can effectively instruct cells to promote the healthy actions of oestrogen and turn down the dial on the more negative impacts. Read more about soy in this article. Natural medicines such as magnesium, broccoli, rosemary, and BCM-95™ Turmeric positively support healthy oestrogen metabolism, helping restore balance.

You can adopt some simple strategies daily to place you on the path of healthy oestrogen balance. Follow the healthy hormone dietary and lifestyle tips in Figure 3 below. Other suggestions include not microwaving food in plastic containers and swapping your plastic drinking bottles for glass or stainless steel – this can help reduce the impact of EDC’s exposure. For more simple tips to detox your environment, check out this blog.

Figure 3: Healthy Hormone Diet and Lifestyle Tips.

By gradually changing your habits, you can reduce exposure to harmful EDCs, improve your oestrogen metabolism, and maintain the beneficial effects that the beautiful hormone called oestrogen may bring. If you would like more support in improving hormonal harmony and freeing yourself from the symptoms of oestrogen imbalance, speak to me today.

References

1. Cutter WJ, Norbury R, Murphy DGM. Oestrogen, brain function, and neuropsychiatric disorders. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry.2003 Jul;74(7):837-840.

2. Shah MG, Maibach HI. Estrogen and skin. An overview. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2001;2(3):143-50. PMID: 11705091

3. Greenspan FS, Gardner DG. Basic and clinical endocrinology. 6th ed. Sydney, Australia: Lange Medical Books/McGraw-Hill; 2001. p. 575-602.

4. Ferrero S, Remorgida V, Maganza C, Venturini PL, Salvatore S, Papaleo E, et al. Aromatase and endometriosis: estrogens play a role. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2014 May;1317:17-23. doi: 10.1111/nyas.12411

5. Bulun SE, Lin Z, Imir G, Amin S, Demura M, Yilmaz B, et al. Regulation of aromatase expression in estrogen-responsive breast and uterine disease: from bench to treatment. Pharmacol Rev. 2005 Sep;57(3):359-83. doi: 10.1124/pr.57.3.6.

6. Chetrite GS, Cortes-Prieto J, Philippe JC, Wright F, Pasqualini JR. Comparison of estrogen concentrations, estrone sulfatase and aromatase activities in normal and in cancerous human breast tissues. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2000 Jan-Feb;72(1-2):23-7. PMID: 10731634.

7. Kuiper GG, Lemmen JG, Carlsson B, Corton JC, Safe SH, van der Saag PT, et al. Interaction of estrogenic chemicals and phytoestrogens with estrogen receptor beta. Endocrinology. 1998 Oct;139(10):4252-4263.

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